The Raj at War

A People’s History of India’s Second World War

The Raj at War

The Second World War was not fought by Britain alone. India produced the largest volunteer army in world history: over 2 million men. But, until now, there has never been a comprehensive account of India's turbulent home front and the nexus between warfare and India’s society. In The Raj at War we hear the myriad voices of ordinary Indian people, from the first Indian to win the Victoria Cross to the three soldiers imprisoned as ‘traitors to the Raj’ who returned to a hero’s welcome, from the nurses in Indian General Hospitals to labourers and their families in remote villages. Yasmin Khan presents the overlooked history of India at war, and shows how mobilisation for the war unleashed seismic processes of economic, cultural and social change – decisively shaping the international war effort, the unravelling of the empire and India’s own political trajectory.

The State at War in South Asia

The State at War in South Asia

This study offers a panoramic view of the evolution of the South Asian state's military system and its contribution to the effectiveness of the state itself."--BOOK JACKET.

The Indian Army and the End of the Raj

The Indian Army and the End of the Raj

A unique examination of the role of the Indian army in post-World War II India in the run-up to Partition. Daniel Marston draws upon extensive archival research and interviews with veterans of the events of 1947 to provide fresh insight into the final days of the British Raj.

The Great Partition

The Making of India and Pakistan, New Edition

The Great Partition

A reappraisal of the tumultuous Partition and how it ignited long-standing animosities between India and Pakistan This new edition of Yasmin Khan’s reappraisal of the tumultuous India-Pakistan Partition features an introduction reflecting on the latest research and on ways in which commemoration of the Partition has changed, and considers the Partition in light of the current refugee crisis. Reviews of the first edition: “A riveting book on this terrible story.”—Economist “Unsparing. . . . Provocative and painful.”—Times (London) “Many histories of Partition focus solely on the elite policy makers. Yasmin Khan’s empathetic account gives a great insight into the hopes, dreams, and fears of the millions affected by it.”—Owen Bennett Jones, BBC

Women Against the Raj

The Rani of Jhansi Regiment

Women Against the Raj

This is a ground-breaking history of the Rani of Jhansi Regiment, part of the Indian National Army led by Bengali revolutionary Subhas Chandra Bose during World War II. The Regiment, a hitherto forgotten part of "the Forgotten Army," was composed largely of teenage volunteers from Malayan rubber estates, girls who had never seen India yet were eager to enlist to liberate India from colonial bondage. Bose, creator of the Regiment, connected a historical thread extending from the original Rani of Jhansi, killed in battle by the British in 1858, through Bengali women revolutionaries of the 1930s, to the Regiment, which he hoped would spearhead the liberation of India. The Rani of Jhansi Regiment provides a model of empowerment relevant for contemporary Indian women.

The Lion and the Tiger

The Rise and Fall of the British Raj, 1600-1947

The Lion and the Tiger

How did a few thousand people from a small, windswept island in the northern seas end up ruling a far distant subcontinent with a population of millions? Were the British in India intent on development or exploitation? Were they really the 'civilizing' influence they claimed? And what were Britain's greatest legacies - democracy and the rule of law, or cricket and an efficient railway system? Best-selling historian Denis Judd tells the epic story of the British impact upon India, capturing the essence of what the Raj really meant both for the British and their Indian subjects.

An Imperial World at War

The British Empire, 1939–45

An Imperial World at War

At the start of the Second World War, Britain was at the height of its imperial power, and it is no surprise that it drew upon the global resources of the Empire once war had been declared. Whilst this international aspect of Britain’s war effort has been well-studied in relation to the military contribution of individual dominions and colonies, relatively little has been written about the Empire as a whole. As such, An Imperial World at War makes an important contribution to the historiography relating to the British Empire and its wartime experience. It argues that the war needs to be viewed in imperial terms, that the role of forces drawn from the Empire is poorly understood and that the war's impact on colonial societies is barely grasped at all in conventional accounts. Through a series of case studies, the volume demonstrates the fundamental role played by the Empire in Britain’s war effort and highlights some of the consequences for both Britain and its imperial territories.Themes include the recruitment and utilization of military formations drawn from imperial territories, the experience of British forces stationed overseas, the use of strategic bases located in the colonies, British policy in the Middle East and the challenge posed by growing American power, the occupation of enemy colonies and the enemy occupation of British colonies, colonial civil defence measures, financial support for the war effort supplied by the Empire, and the commemoration of the war. The Afterword anticipates a new, decentred history of the war that properly acknowledges the role and importance of people and places throughout the colonial and semi-colonial world.’ This volume emanates from a conference organized as part of the ‘Home Fronts of the Empire – Commonwealth’ project. The project was generously funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and led by Yasmin Khan and Ashley Jackson with Gajendra Singh as Postdoctoral Research Assistant.

Gentlemen of the Raj

The Indian Army Officer Corps, 1817-1949

Gentlemen of the Raj

The book Alzheimer's Disease - Epidemiology, Neuropathology, Neurochemistry, and Clinics is derived from an International Symposium on the occasion of the 125th Anniversary of the Birth of Alois Alzheimer (14.6.1864-19.12.1915). Over the past decade, as the elderly have become the fastest-growing segment of the population in industrialized countries, Alzheimer's disease has emerged as one of the major mental health problems. The contributors to this book represent internationally recognized authorities in the field of dementia and present new information about epidemiology, neuropathology, neurochemistry, and clinics in Alzheimer's disease. This book is a rich and valuable up-to-date resource for psychiatrists, neurologists, scientists working in the fields of neuropathology, neurochemistry and molecular genetics, behavioral scientists, family physicians and all who share an interest in understanding and treating the older individual with Alzheimer's disease/dementia.

The Sepoy and the Raj

The Indian Army, 1860-1940

The Sepoy and the Raj

This is the first scholarly study of the subject for twenty years, and the only one based on extensive archival research. The Indian Army conquered India for the British, and protected the Raj against its enemies within and without. In this evocative and compassionate work, David Omissi examines the origins, motives and protests of the several million Indian peasant- soldiers who served the colonial power.

Fighting the People's War

The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War

Fighting the People's War

Jonathan Fennell captures for the first time the true wartime experience of the ordinary soldiers from across the empire who made up the British and Commonwealth armies. He analyses why the great battles were won and lost and how the men that fought went on to change the world.