My Life with Bonnie and Clyde

My Life with Bonnie and Clyde

Bonnie and Clyde were responsible for multiple murders and countless robberies. But they did not act alone. In 1933, during their infamous run from the law, Bonnie and Clyde were joined by Clyde’s brother Buck Barrow and his wife Blanche. Of these four accomplices, only one—Blanche Caldwell Barrow—lived beyond early adulthood and only Blanche left behind a written account of their escapades. Edited by outlaw expert John Neal Phillips, Blanche’s previously unknown memoir is here available for the first time. Blanche wrote her memoir between 1933 and 1939, while serving time at the Missouri State Penitentiary. Following her death, Blanche’s good friend and the executor of her will, Esther L. Weiser, found the memoir wrapped in a large unused Christmas card. Later she entrusted it to Phillips, who had interviewed Blanche several times before her death. Drawing from these interviews, and from extensive research into Depression-era outlaw history, Phillips supplements the memoir with helpful notes and with biographical information about Blanche and her accomplices.

Go Down Together

The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde

Go Down Together

From the moment they first cut a swathe of crime across 1930s America, Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker have been glamorised in print, on screen and in legend. The reality of their brief and catastrophic lives is very different -- and far more fascinating. Combining exhaustive research with surprising, newly discovered material, author Jeff Guinn tells the real story of two youngsters from a filthy Dallas slum who fell in love and then willingly traded their lives for a brief interlude of excitement and, more important, fame. Thanks in great part to surviving relatives of Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker, who provided Guinn with access to never-before-published family documents and photographs, this book reveals the truth behind the myth, told with cinematic sweep and unprecedented insight by a master storyteller.

Running With Bonnie and Clyde

The Ten Fast Years of Ralph Fults

Running With Bonnie and Clyde

One of the most sought-after criminals of the Depression era, Ralph Fults began his career of crime at the improbable age of fourteen. At nineteen he met Clyde Barrow in a Texas prison, and the two men together founded what would later be known as the Barrow gang. Running with Bonnie and Clyde is the story of Fults's experiences in the Texas criminal underworld between the years 1925 and 1935 and the gripping account of his involvement with the Barrow gang, particularly its notorious duo, Bonnie and Clyde. Fults's "ten fast years" were both dramatic and violent. As an adolescent he escaped numerous juvenile institutions and jails, was shot by an Oklahoma police officer, and was brutalized by prison guards. With Clyde, following their fateful meeting in 1930, he robbed a bank to finance a prison raid. After the ambush of Bonnie and Clyde, in 1934, he joined forces with Raymond Hamilton; together the two robbed more banks and eluded countless posses before Hamilton's capture and 1935 execution. One of the few survivors among numerous associates who ended up shot, stabbed, beaten to death, or executed, Fults was later able to reform himself, believing that the only reason he was spared was to reveal the darkest aspects of his past-and in so doing expose the circumstances that propel youth into crime. Author John Neal Phillips tells Fults's story in vivid and at times raw detail, recounting bank robberies, killings, and prison escapes, friendships, love affairs, and marriages. Dialogues based on actual conversations amongst the participants enhance the narrative's authenticity. Whereas in books and mms, Fults, Parker, Barrow, and Hamilton have been romanticized or depicted as one-dimensional, depraved characters, Running with Bonnie and Clyde shows them as real people, products of social, political, and economic forces that directed them into a life of crime and bound them to it for eternity. Although basing his account primarily on Fults's testimony, Phillips substantiates that viewpoint with references to scores of eyewitness interviews, police files and court documents, and contemporary news accounts. An important contribution to criminal and social history, Running with Bonnie and Clyde will be fascinating reading for scholars and general readers alike.

Bonnie and Clyde and Marie

A Sister's Perspective on the Notorious Barrow Gang

Bonnie and Clyde and Marie

"I had known Marie since autumn, 1993, after both of us had worked on a documentary titled Remembering Bonnie and Clyde. She brought in the "death shirt" and other items to be photographed for this program. I watched her being interviewed and was impressed by the story she had to tell. A few days afterward, I sent Marie a small thank-you card with a note telling her how much I enjoyed meeting her and that if I could ever be of assistance, she should call. I didn't expect a response, but shortly thereafter, Marie called and asked to meet with me, and thus began one of the richest and most interesting times of my life." --Jonathan Davis "It's probably too late to change the overall perception that the American public has of my brothers Clyde and Buck, as well as Clyde's sweetheart Bonnie Parker and Buck's wife Blanche Caldwell Barrow. The public's perspective on my family members and friends has been reinforced by over 60 years of caricature and exaggeration through the output of the publishing houses and the Hollywood studios. It began during the days of the old newsreels in the movie houses and has continued unchanged up through today's modern cable television networks and satellite communications. No matter which medium carries the message, the message itself is typically 100% pure baloney. The proper place to begin to tell the story of my brothers, Clyde and Buck, is with our parents, since my father and my mother played such a big part in all of our lives. Henry B. Barrow, my father, was born in Pensacola, Florida, on January 10, 1873 . . . Back in those days, mandatory school attendance was taken pretty lightly. In fact, my father only went to school one-half-day in his life. The day he attempted to go, he was brought back home in a buggy after getting sick at school. Early in his life, he was afflicted with chills and this condition stayed with him throughout his childhood years. I've always felt that my father was a victim of a malaria attack back in his Florida days, to which he developed a severe reaction. He was extremely sickly as a child in Florida, and this condition carried over to his early adolescent years in Texas. However, he was able to assist on his father's farm as his health improved in his later teen years. Apparently getting away from the mosquito-infested Pensacola region of the 1880's eventually improved my father's health." --Marie Barrow Scoma

Becoming Bonnie

A Novel

Becoming Bonnie

Perfect for readers of Paula McClain, Lisa Wingate, and Hazel Gaynor, and fans of Bonnie and Clyde, Breaking Bad and Netflix's The Highwaymen, Jenni L. Walsh's sparkling debut tells the story of Bonnie Parker as it's never been told before—in her own words. It's the summer of 1927, and Bonnelyn Parker is more likely to belt out a church hymn than sling drinks at an illicit juice joint. She’s a sharp girl with plans to overcome her family's poverty, provide for herself, and maybe someday marry her boyfriend, Roy Thornton. But in Cement City, Texas, there aren't many jobs a girl can do. When Bonnelyn finds work at Doc's, Dallas's newest speakeasy, she finds herself falling hard—for the music, for the freedom, and for a young man with a hint of danger in his smile. Bonnie is about to meet Clyde Barrow. And her life—like her country—is headed for a crash. "How do you get from good girl to gangster's moll? Jenni Walsh takes you along for the ride with Bonnelyn Parker in an account so vivid you would think you were there with her.”—New York Times bestselling author Lauren Willig "In Becoming Bonnie, Jenni Walsh delivers an intriguing insight into the life of one half of the infamous duo, Bonnie and Clyde. I look forward to reading more from this new author." —New York Times bestselling author Hazel Gaynor At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Bonnie and Clyde

A Biography

Bonnie and Clyde

Traces the childhoods and criminal careers of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, America's most notorious criminal couple.

Depression Desperado

The Chronicle of Raymond Hamilton

Depression Desperado

An incredible crime-ridden folly of our hard times.

From Bonnie and Clyde to Federal Prison

From Bonnie and Clyde to Federal Prison

Many articles have been written about Bonnie and Clyde however much of it is Hollywood and not correct. I have stayed with facts and tried to tell exactly what happened to this famous pain of Criminals during the Great Depression. The so called Crime Spree was started when Clyde got out of prison in 1932 and killed in 1934. Clyde was raped repeatly while serving time in Eastham Farm a part of the Texas State prison in Huntsville, Texas. They killed 9 Policemen and would also kill 5 civilians if they were threatened. They also loved to kidnap people 7 that we know of that included a police chief and a deputy sheriff rode them aroud releasing them unharmed. Bonnie wrote poems and took pictures that made the newspapers and intriged the public putting them in the spotlight to where everyone admired them and almost worshiped what they were doing. This book has murder, kidnapping, romance, sex, robberey, danger death, and excitement that goes way beyond any movie because it is all true. It tells about how people had to live during the Great Depression. Also Welch spent eleven years working in FCI, Federal Correction Institute in Talladega Alabama as Crafts Supervisor tells about life there and about how inmates lived day to day. Most of all he wanted to correct some of falsehoods portside in some of the films about Bonnie and Clyde and prison itself. These two will never be forgotton and information is still surfacing to this day and many more movies will be made about them. On Clyde Barrow's tomestone are the words, "Gone but Not Forgotten".

The Lives and Times of Bonnie & Clyde

The Lives and Times of Bonnie & Clyde

The author carefully gleaned materials from obscure locally published accounts, previously untapped court records, and archived but unpublished oral history accounts from some sixty victims, neighbors, relatives, and police who were involved in the exploits of the infamous duo. Using this information, he traces the violent path of Bonnie and Clyde until May 23, 1934, when they die in an ambush.

The New Yorker Theater and Other Scenes from a Life at the Movies

The New Yorker Theater and Other Scenes from a Life at the Movies

The nation didn't know it, but 1960 would change American film forever, and the revolution would occur nowhere near a Hollywood set. With the opening of the New Yorker Theater, a cinema located at the heart of Manhattan's Upper West Side, cutting-edge films from around the world were screened for an eager audience, including the city's most influential producers, directors, critics, and writers. Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Susan Sontag, Andrew Sarris, and Pauline Kael, among many others, would make the New Yorker their home, trusting in the owners' impeccable taste and incorporating much of what they viewed into their work. In this irresistible memoir, Toby Talbot, co-owner and proud "matron" of the New Yorker Theater, reveals the story behind Manhattan's wild and wonderful affair with art-house film. With her husband Dan, Talbot showcased a range of eclectic films, introducing French New Wave and New German cinema, along with other groundbreaking genres and styles. As Vietnam protests and the struggle for civil rights raged outside, the Talbots also took the lead in distributing political films, such as Bernard Bertolucci's Before the Revolution, and documentaries, such as Shoah and Point of Order. Talbot enhances her stories with selections from the New Yorker's essential archives, including program notes by Jack Kerouac, Jules Feiffer, Peter Bogdanovich, Jonas Mekas, Jack Gelber, and Harold Humes. These artifacts testify to the deeply engaged and collaborative spirit behind each showing, and they illuminate the myriad and often entertaining aspects of theater operation. All in all, Talbot's tales capture the highs and lows of a thrilling era in filmmaking.