Jack the Ripper

Jack the Ripper

Andrew Cook goes in search of the real story of Jack the Ripper - and this story isn't set in the brothels of the East End but in the boardrooms of Fleet Street. This is a tale of hysteria whipped up by competing tabloid editors and publishers.

Jack the Ripper

From the Cradle to the Grave

Jack the Ripper

You’ve never read a Ripper book like this. Christian was born in 1852. He carried out a sexual attack on a local girl and so fled to London to avoid being lynched. He and best friend Jimmy became trainee surgeons with a nefarious organization (The Firm). Both men fell in love with the same woman. Christian later illegally married her and further on became a whoremaster. In 1888, after he found out his “wife” had had a long sexual affair (and a child) with his best friend, his drug use and rage led him to release his wrath upon the prostitutes he formerly protected. Lauretta his “wife” kept a diary writing about him realizing she was married to Jack the Ripper. After he brutally murdered numerous women usually for a reason as it was not random, he realized there was one loose end: Jimmy’s son. Thus, members of The Firm were hired to murder him secretly and dispose of the body. In 1913, the Ripper died after suffering via a STD. After his death, his family found a stash of money in his favourite armchair. His family lived on without him, and Lauretta (the hero) didn’t pass over until 1934.

Jack the Ripper

The Forgotten Victims

Jack the Ripper

DIVThe number of women murdered and mutilated by Jack the Ripper is impossible to know, although most researchers now agree on five individuals. These five canonical cases have been examined at length in Ripper literature, but other contemporary murders and attacks bearing strong resemblance to the gruesome Ripper slayings have received scant attention. These unsolved cases are the focus of this intriguing book. The volume devotes separate chapters to a dozen female victims who were attacked during the years of Jack the Ripper’s murder spree. Their terrible stories—a few survived to bear witness, but most died of their wounds—illuminate key aspects of the Ripper case and the period: the gangs of London’s Whitechapel district, Victorian prostitutes, the public panic inspired by the crimes and fueled by journalists, medical practices of the day, police procedures and competency, and the probable existence of other serial killers. The book also considers crimes initially attributed to Jack the Ripper in other parts of Britain and the world, notably New York, Jamaica, and Nicaragua. In a final chapter, the drive to find the identity of the Ripper is examined, looking at contemporary and later suspects as well as several important theories, revealing the lengths to which some have gone to claim success in identifying Jack the Ripper./div

Complete Jack The Ripper

Complete Jack The Ripper

Fully updated and revised, Donald Rumbelow’s classic work is the ultimate examination of the facts, theories, fictions and fascinations surrounding the greatest whodunit in history. The Complete Jack the Ripper lays out all the evidence in the most comprehensive summary ever written about the Ripper. Rumbelow, a former London Metropolitan policeman, and an authority on crime, has subjected every theory – including those that have emerged in recent years – to the same deep scrutiny. He also examines the mythology surrounding the case and provides some fascinating insights into the portrayal of the Ripper on stage and screen and on the printed page. More seriously, he also examines the horrifying parallel crimes of the Düsseldorf Ripper and the Yorkshire Ripper in an attempt to throw further light on the atrocities of Victorian London.

Jack The Ripper and the East End

Introduction by Peter Ackroyd

Jack The Ripper and the East End

In 1888, Whitechapel - at the heart of the inner East End - was the most (in)famous place in the country, widely imagined as a site of the blackest and deepest horror. Its streets and alleys were seen as violent and dangerous, overflowing with poverty and depravity. This book aims to uncover the reality of East End life. Sections look at slum housing, immigration, attitudes to women, poverty, violence and crime. The book examines how the brutal killings were reported and how the police tried to identify the murderer. A final section shows how Jack the Ripper has shaped our vision of London, and influenced our popular culture. Jack the Ripper and the East End coincides with an exhibition organised by the Museum of London at their Museum in Docklands. Key surviving documents from the National Archives and the London Metropolitan Archives will be on display - in addition to material from the collections of the Museum of London such as photographs of the Whitechapel Mission. The illustrations for the book will include rare and unpublished photographs, sections of the 'master' Booth Map of Poverty, detectives' reports and original letters. The introduction will be written by Peter Ackroyd, who is the acknowledged expert on London, its darker aspects and how its history has seeped into its very stones. Leading historians and curators will provide additional insights. This is a book which will be valued for years to come for its enduring and important portrait of the Victorian East End.

Jack the Ripper

An Encyclopedia

Jack the Ripper

A detailed and meticulously researched encyclopedia on all aspects of Jack the Ripper, one of the world's most famous, and mysterious, serial killers. * 450+ entries arranged around themes such as suspects, victims, police, myths, and errors * Verbatim accounts of eight important letters written at the times of the murders that may be genuine, or that other writers have claimed to be genuine * A timeline of the era of Jack the Ripper, beginning with a poisoning in 1887 and ending with the writing of the Littlechild letter in 1913 * 12 maps detailing the location of each murder * Numerous photographs including explicit postmortem photos of many of the victims attributed to Jack the Ripper

Jack the Ripper

Jack the Ripper

So who was Jack the Ripper? No-one in the annals of crime is capable of arousing such passionate debate as the perpetrator of the Whitechapel Murders in 1888.Was he a demented Royal, a Masonic assassin, a sexually-frustrated artist, a member of the Czarist secret police, a crazed reformist or even an escaped gorilla?

Jack The Ripper: Letters from Hell

Jack The Ripper: Letters from Hell

The name Jack the Ripper is instantly recognised throughout the world, yet many people are unaware that the famous nickname first appeared in a letter or that this was where the whole legend of Jack the Ripper really began. This title poses a controversial question: was Jack the Ripper merely a press invention?

Jack the Ripper: Case Closed

Jack the Ripper: Case Closed

London. 1894. 'I am not a detective, chief constable.' 'No, but you are a poet, a freemason and a man of the world. All useful qualifications for the business in hand.' So says Police Chief Macnaghten to Oscar Wilde, in a Chelsea drawing room in the company of Arthur Conan Doyle. The business they are gathered to discuss is none other than the case of Jack the Ripper, the most notorious murderer in England. And thus the three men set out to solve one of the world's most famous mysteries - the ultimate truth about the identity of Jack the Ripper. Case Closed is Arthur Conan Doyle's account of the events of 1894, the year of the return of Jack the Ripper. Based on Oscar Wilde's real-life friendship with Conan Doyle and the extraordinary but little-known fact that in 1894 the detective in charge of the Jack the Ripper investigations was Oscar Wilde's neighbour in Tite Street, Chelsea, this is a revelatory and gripping detective story, combining the intrigue of a classic murder mystery with a witty and compelling portrait of one of the greatest characters of the Victorian age.

Jack the Ripper

Jack the Ripper