Goodbye Newsroom

Goodbye Newsroom

Leap into the frantic and funny world of sisters Anna and Holly, out-of-work journalists who launch their own news site. A contemporary romantic comedy, set in Australia and Uruguay.

Among the Woo People

A Survival Guide for Living in a College Town

Among the Woo People

In the mid-nineties, Russell Frank left a peaceful life in rural California to raise three kids in a town saturated with fraternities, late-night undergrad fast food haunts, and rowdy football crowds. Among the Woo People recounts his two decades living—and surviving—in State College, Pennsylvania, the often-chaotic home of Penn State University. This humorous peek at life in a college town smack-dab in the middle of rural Pennsylvania chronicles a changing community over the course of two eventful decades. A professor of journalism, former columnist for the Centre Daily Times, and contributor to StateCollege.com, Frank has a unique perspective on living in the shadow of a university—especially on the tribe of nomadic young adults known as the “Woo people,” so named for their signature mode of celebratory communication. He invites readers into the routines of his hectic household as they embrace their new home, skewers the culture of intercollegiate sports, relates the challenges and peculiarities of teaching at one of the nation’s largest universities, and, most important, teaches us to be amused at college-kid antics and to appreciate their academic and real-world accomplishments, even as we anxiously tick off the days until semester’s end. From tales of missing porch furniture and red plastic cups in the bushes to a “Nude Year’s Eve” run by an octet of forty-somethings to the sweet relief of summer, Frank’s hilarious, insightful essays are indispensable for anyone who wants to survive, appreciate, and enjoy college-town life.

Soviet Salvage

Imperial Debris, Revolutionary Reuse, and Russian Constructivism

Soviet Salvage

In the mid-nineties, Russell Frank left a peaceful life in rural California to raise three kids in a town saturated with fraternities, late-night undergrad fast food haunts, and rowdy football crowds. Among the Woo People recounts his two decades living—and surviving—in State College, Pennsylvania, the often-chaotic home of Penn State University. This humorous peek at life in a college town smack-dab in the middle of rural Pennsylvania chronicles a changing community over the course of two eventful decades. A professor of journalism, former columnist for the Centre Daily Times, and contributor to StateCollege.com, Frank has a unique perspective on living in the shadow of a university—especially on the tribe of nomadic young adults known as the “Woo people,” so named for their signature mode of celebratory communication. He invites readers into the routines of his hectic household as they embrace their new home, skewers the culture of intercollegiate sports, relates the challenges and peculiarities of teaching at one of the nation’s largest universities, and, most important, teaches us to be amused at college-kid antics and to appreciate their academic and real-world accomplishments, even as we anxiously tick off the days until semester’s end. From tales of missing porch furniture and red plastic cups in the bushes to a “Nude Year’s Eve” run by an octet of forty-somethings to the sweet relief of summer, Frank’s hilarious, insightful essays are indispensable for anyone who wants to survive, appreciate, and enjoy college-town life.

The Short Goodbye

A skewed history of the last boom and the next bust

The Short Goodbye

Elisabeth Wynhausen was at her desk writing a story about people being sacked when she was sacked herself. The Short Goodbye is the untold story of a nation forever changed by the global financial crisis and the people whose lives have been glossed over in the grand narratives of politicians and commentators. With verve and wit, she dissects the myth that Australia dodged a financial bullet by documenting the lives of those discarded on an economic minefield, from bankers to factory workers, and warns that without reform Australia could suffer a more terrible social and economic calamity from the next global rout.

F**k You And Goodbye

The History of the World in Resignation Letters

F**k You And Goodbye

History is written by the winners. It's the faithful servants, the insiders, the ones who stick around, who can adapt to almost any condition that get to write the official histories. They publish the memoirs, park in the directors' spots, erect the statues, form the new governments, wipe out the pockets of resistance, recruit the new starters, set the agendas, talk on the documentaries and retrospectives. Yet theirs - the official version - is never the whole story. The quitter's tale offers a far more compelling, and often a more honest version of history. The Last Goodbye, Matt Potter collects the pithiest, angriest, most hilarious messages of resignation throughout history, including those whose exits were a springboard to eventual success, such as Steve Jobs, George Orwell and Charlie Sheen.It's full of self-deception, bloody knives, betrayal, honour, disgrace, disgust, thwarted ambition and shattered hopes, and sometimes a wicked sting in the tail . . .

What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know about Fibromyalgia

Why Doctors Can’t or Won’t Treat Chronic Pain

What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know about Fibromyalgia

FMS, a common term for fibromyalgia, attacks men, women, and even children of all ages, varying in intensity from patient to patient. Because doctors do not like to treat conditions they don’t understand, patients are often ignored, denied pain relief, shuttled off to other “experts,” or filled with powerful prescription drugs that may add new and confusing symptoms. Thus begins a vicious cycle of frustrating doctor appointments with no clear diagnoses and continuing treatments that may or may not lead to any relief. If you’ve always trusted that most of your doctors are up-to-date, informed, and rarely mistaken about a diagnosis or treatment, What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know about Fibromyalgia may change your mind. Fibromyalgia is listed as one of the top ten most painful conditions in medicine, but many doctors still do not “believe” in it. If they do recognize it, they have only a vague notion of a collection of mild symptoms that they attribute to stress, menstrual problems, weight gain, depression, or hysteria—none of which have been scientifically linked to fibromyalgia. What Your Doctor Doesn't Know about Fibromyalgia will help you take charge of your condition and teach you how to find physicians you can trust so that you can obtain the relief you need.

Goodbye, Gutenberg

The Newspaper Revolution of the 1980s

Goodbye, Gutenberg

A cogent analysis of the new realities of newspaper publishing created by the revolutionary use of computers considers the potential of computerization to alter the quantity, nature, and texture of information and identifies new elements in the definition